History of board shorts

A brief history of board shorts

Board shorts would seem the most logical attire to go surfing in. However, when Captain Cook first saw surfing in Hawaii the locals were going one better – they surfed naked.
When surfing was revived, around the turn of last century, neck to knee woollen tank suits were required to protect the riders’ modesty.
By the 1930s Hawaiian surfers were challenging social mores, doffing the top and exposing the nipples – the first board shorts were born!
Hang Ten, which had been around since the mid-60s making cotton trunks, rose to fame and became California’s first real major brand.
In 1966, they sponsored the first group of “team riders”, of which Greg Knoll was one. They were the first brand to really establish an international market.
Some say the originator of the modern board short.
In the early-70s the surf industry was making its first forays out of home industry manufacturing with companies blossoming in Torquay, Sydney, and the Gold Coast, as well as Southern California.
Product development helped distinguish the wares of each company with function becoming as critical as form.
In the 80s Okanuis treated hibiscus prints and watermelon slices as the height of the designer board shorts fashion.
By the early-80s surfwear was a byword for youth wear and with a spring tide of teens behind them, the surf companies boomed.
The images they projected were cocksure, colourful, and bucket loads of fun.
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